Market trends

Content on market trends

What’s in it for me? Why placemaking matters

Why does city planning matter to people who aren’t urban designer types? Here’s an elevator pitch and a more detailed answer.

Mr. Kotkin talks about what "people really want"

An off-target Washington Post column complains that urban planners cater to only "hipsters and older, sophisticated urban dwellers" rather than "most middle-class residents."

What the latest housing data mean for the environment

Let’s not pronounce sprawl dead just yet. Compared at least to the last five years, things might get a little worse before they get better. But the resurgence in city living is real.

Why 'place' is the new American dream

The new American Dream will transform cities and towns in the 21st Century. To understand it, we have to grasp a few features of the previous American Dream.

Authors declare 'The beginning of the end of sprawl'

A strong trend toward walkable urban places is turning around development in the 30 top US metro areas, according to a study by Christopher Leinberger and Patrick Lynch.

America split between two community ideals

A Pew Research Center nationwide survey showed that America is divided nearly down the middle between preference for walkable urban and drivable suburban living arrangements.

The new urgency of 'thinking globally, acting locally'

The statistics are staggering.  Over the next five decades, if present trends do not reverse dramatically, humanity is set to create more sheer volume of urban settlement than it has in all of human history.

What is the new American Dream?

The new American Dream is about place, and that brings people and communities together. The 20th Century American Dream tended to pull cities and towns apart. 

Let the best dream win

The old American Dream of keeping up with the Joneses built the suburbs. The new one could rebuild our cities, towns, and neighborhoods and revitalize the suburbs for our children.

Top 10 reasons for a new American Dream

For three generations, the American Dream was largely defined by continual suburban expansion. A new urban dream has emerged, and it is here to stay.

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