Infill

Infill, grayfield, and brownfield redevelopment

A model for transit-oriented revitalization

Once a railway coal siding and more recently a full city block of asphalt surface parking, North Philadelphia’s Paseo Verde now provides affordable, high quality, sustainable housing for a range of income levels.

Anchor a revitalization with an arts plaza

Torti Gallas and Partners led a CNU "Legacy Charrette" team that recommended streetscape improvements and other pedestrian enhancements throughout the Six Points Urban Village.

The four phases of New Urbanism

The New Urbanism is emerging slowly, in phases. We are only partway through a change that will take generations. We are now immmersed in the revitalization of cities. More phases will come.

It's all coming together in Providence

Since the mid-1980s, the city has seen a slow, but steady, resurgence. The renovation of old buildings and wise infrastructure decisions have helped the 200-year-old downtown.

Is it time to change the narrative about Detroit?

As recently as 2009, there were 48 large (five stories or taller) empty buildings downtown.  (Wow.)  But, today, the number is down to 13.

Place-based development and streetcar transforming downtown Tucson

Restaurants, retail, offices, and adobe homes pop-up in and around the long-suffering downtown damaged by urban renewal.

What the latest housing data mean for the environment

Let’s not pronounce sprawl dead just yet. Compared at least to the last five years, things might get a little worse before they get better. But the resurgence in city living is real.

New shared-space waterfront for DC

A 12-block waterfront redevelopment broke ground in Washington DC that extensively uses the concept of "share-space" streets for the purpose of placemaking.

New Urbanism’s impact on mid-sized and smaller cities

Birmingham, Michigan; Albuquerque, New Mexico; Providence, Rhode Island; and others that adopted a new urban approach 15 or 20 years ago have transformed themselves.

Making multifamily truly urban

The multifamily industry is building more in walkable locations, but developers still need instruction on the manners of placemaking. Here are some hints.

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