Health

Content on health issues

Compact street networks support better health

The study published in the Journal of Transport & Health shows lower levels of high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, and obesity.

Placemaking is critical for the local economy

Do you want your community to thrive in the future? If so, placemaking is a key to making that happen.

Good news on sprawl: It doesn't increase heart disease

Bad news: Traffic fatalities, cost of living, upward mobility, body mass index, obesity, physical activity, life expectancy, high blood pressure, diabetes.

The life and death prospects of community ties

As urbanists, we know that our innate desire to feel connected is nothing trivial.

Health and smart growth: Safety tops obesity

There are two primary fronts in the healthy communities movement — safety and obesity. A stronger emphasis on safety is more likely to succeed with citizens and public officials.

Controlling for poverty, urban places are thinner

Some commentators have trotted out the old argument that plenty of city-dwellers, especially in poor areas, are fat, so sprawl doesn't matter to obesity. The data suggests otherwise.

Why community design is important to public health

Claims related to community design and health should be modest. Yet with health care consuming more than 17 percent of the US economy, even a modest improvement can make a significant impact.

The tragedy of the cul-de-sac

A new study provides more confirmation that violent and accidental deaths of all kinds are more common in suburban and rural areas. The primary cause: Automobile accidents.

Next healthcare breakthrough? Walkable communities

More than 100 organizations, ranging from the National PTA to the American Lung Association to AARP to NAACP to Nike, heard the US surgeon general announce a "call to action on walking."

Crowdsourcing = data = better places

Thanks to your responses, a new collaborative Google map, called Aging in Connected Places, which intends to track especially great places to age, is born.

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