Codes

Form-based codes and guidelines

Beaufort County Eliminates PUDs in Favor of Walkable Neighborhoods!

Beaufort County followed the Town of Port Royal to become the second of three local jurisdictions to adopt a shared, Form-Based Coding platform. Opticos was commissioned in 2010 to create a multijurisdictional Form-Based Code that Beaufort County, the City of Beaufort, and the Town of Port Royal could share in order to better coordinate growth between the three jurisdictions, help channel future growth toward existing urban areas, and protect the county’s rural character. Opticos worked closely with all three communities to create a shared framework of Transect zones and related standards that could be adapted to the needs of each community.

System A and System B

When the research favors compact, mixed-use neighborhoods, why does government favor sprawl?

'Deadwood City' no more, thanks to new code

With the help of a form-based code (FBC), Redwood City, California, has become the new Silicon Valley hot spot.

This area protected by form-based codes

A cartoon by Dhiru Thadani points out the potential of form-based codes to preserve open space, which is sometimes overlooked. 

Form-based code adopted to redevelop business campus

The Hartford, a Fortune 500 insurance and investment firm based in Hartford, Connecticut, is using form-based coding to spur redevelopment of its 173-acre former business campus.

Top 10 Misconceptions about form-based codes

Several common assumptions about new urban codes fail to stand up to scrutiny.

Major transit-oriented project advances in Atlanta suburb

A form-based code is approved for the City of Doraville’s town center and former GM factory.

Cincinnati Form-Based Code Earns Top Award at CNU22

The Cincinnati Form-Based Code led by Opticos was awarded the Grand Prize for Best Planning Tool or Process at the Congress for the New Urbanism’s 13th Annual Charter Awards in Buffalo, N.Y., held during CNU’s annual Congress, June 4 – 7. Cincinnati’s Form-Based Code, one of the largest of its kind in the country, was adopted last year.

Mission accomplished? Not yet

I agree that many consumers demand more walkable development, both in cities and in suburbs. But even in relatively prosperous, safe cities, the political obstacles to meeting this demand are enormous.

Streetcar is approved for Columbia Pike

Columbia Pike in Arlington, Virginia, one of the more successful commercial strip redevelopment areas spurred by a form-based code, will get a streetcar.

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