Content on highways

Freeway Free: A vision for the city

Freeway-Free San Francisco, a new report by CNU, lays out a plan for better living and transportation while making room for affordable housing.

Smart thinking on transportation

Street Smart, a first-hand account from a contrarian engineer who rose to the top of his profession when the automobile was king, offers valuable insights into America's infrastructure problems.

We don't really care about automobile accidents

After all the gruesome crashes, with countless little crosses lining the roadways, here’s what I’ve learned: We don’t really care. We don’t really care how many people die or are injured.

The political battle over America's streets and roads

Now that demand for walkable urban places outstrips supply, a generational political crash is emerging over infrastructure.

A new village for compact regional growth

Form Ithaca examined how spread-out growth in the Town of Ithaca can be reorganized into a village with a complete street connecting to downtown.

What (and who) is Big Asphalt, and how does it harm America?

The sheer amount of pavement we lay down is compromising health, safety, and welfare. It is a barrier to livability, complete streets, sprawl repair, and meeting the demand for walkable places.

‘Good bones’ are the key to good urbanism

Now we have two systems—one with good bones, completed about 100 years ago. The other, without good bones, comprises most of our metro areas.

Streets for people, freeways, and a spectacular solution

Seoul reengineers a freeway into a stream—most observers seem to consider the project a net plus for the city.

How the ITE overestimates traffic

The Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) manual for trip generation radically overestimates traffic spurred by new development, measuring "phantom trips" that never materialize.

Social striving propels the drive-only suburban machine

Coalitions and strategic politics — and shifting cultural values — can deliver the structural change needed to allow American urbanism to flower again, according to Benjamin Ross, author of Dead End.

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