Architecture

Content about architecture

Why small will go big in 2015

An urge to new thinking comes at the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, when the Katrina Cottages were used to address a combination of issues: sustainability, affordability, and right-sized living. 

Frontages: A city's smallest part but greatest asset

They’re the thinnest and smallest of a city’s elemental parts, but “frontages” do more to create or kill value than any other single element. 

Jane Jacobs was right

Older and smaller buildings and a wide range in building age offer real economic and social benefits for neighborhoods and urban centers, according to a study. 

Urban Acupuncture: A concise, entertaining jumble of ideas

Review of Urban Acupuncture, a book by Jaime Lerner. Island Press, hardcover 160 pp., 2014, $19.99

Seven reasons behind the Shanghaiing of New York

How Big Finance and global forces are driving the shiny Starchitecture in New York, Paris, and London that is indistinguishable from skyscrapers in Dubai, Mumbai, and Shanghai.

What we like - and don't like - about our cities

American city dwellers place a high value on restaurants and farmers’ markets, historic buildings and good public spaces. Traffic, not so much.

A better way to build in the suburbs

Here are 10 reasons why a new, small, apartment complex in Chico, California, creates a "place" in the suburbs.

Charter Awards honor wide variety of projects

A form-based code and affordable transit-oriented development tie for Grand Prize in CNU annual design awards.

What makes a good Main Street work?

While some Main Streets seem well past their prime, others – like Corning’s – remain thriving to this day. Why? Location is important, but design and context also matter.

Older buildings, continuity of place, and the human experience

Compared to districts dominated by larger, newer buildings, those with smaller and older buildings were found to have several key advantages.

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