Economy

Dealing with the current economy

The economic value of a unique place

Decisions such as where to invest, where to work, where to retire, and where to vacation are all made based on what a community looks like, says a ULI scholar.

Cities are coming back, but urban poverty remains an immense challenge

Little has done greater damage to our environment (as well as to our economy and social fabric) than the mass exodus from older cities and towns in the latter half of the 20th century.

Dallas-Fort Worth is a laboratory for placemaking

The region is at a crossroads between Texas-sized sprawl and connected, walkable neighborhoods. Every national issue on land use and transportation is playing out in DFW and will be debated at CNU.

Jane Jacobs was right

Older and smaller buildings and a wide range in building age offer real economic and social benefits for neighborhoods and urban centers, according to a study. 

Multimodal station and plan spur town’s revival

Uptown Station in Normal, Illinois—the first TIGER project to break ground four years ago—spurred impressive growth in transit and mixed-use private downtown investment.

Protecting watersheds as we grow our cities and towns

We don't have to choose between a growing population and healthy economy, on the one hand, and a healthy and sustainable environment, on the other. We really can have it both ways.

How sprawl, inadequate transit worsen unemployment

Recently laid-off workers who live far from job centers take longer to find employment than do residents of neighborhoods more convenient to jobs by public transit or car.

New book on The Economics of Place

The Michigan Municipal League (MML) has published a follow-up book to its 2011 The Economics of Place. The new book is focused on implementation.

Placemaking is critical for the local economy

Do you want your community to thrive in the future? If so, placemaking is a key to making that happen.

‘Sense of place’ is key to regional talent strategy

Led by the Walton Family Foundation, Northwest Arkansas officials look to walkable urban solutions for future economic growth.

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