Building

Content about building and construction

Multifamily: from 'train wreck' to urban

In a comprehensive piece called "What's New in New Urbanism," Multi-Housing News reports that new urban ideas have "swept the industry over the past 20 years."

Why patient and sustainable neighborhood building is so hard today

The public and private sectors each need to learn some lessons from the ways most great old places developed because those ways are far more sustainable and require a lot less debt.

Italianate designs featured on Houzz.com from Building Design Associates, Inc.,

Preliminary sketches/concepts through full construction drawing and also licensing of existing designs are displayed on the website. Residential design specializing in classical style exteriors with floor plans are designed for modern living. The focus is on homes for New Urbanism, traditional neighborhood developments, infill/narrow lots, and also custom design services for individual residences. 

For more, visit here:

This little house

A jaw-dropping example of how building construction culture has degraded, written from the perspective of a non-architect.

Is sprawl returning? Sure, to a degree

Developers operating on greenfield sites, at scale, mostly build drive-only sprawl. That won't change until more suburban towns reform their planning and zoning policies.

Building a multi-century house

A video make clear the difference in construction between the affordable, structural masonry house built by Clay Chapman and a conventional stick-built house.

Reconsidering Seaside, Florida

I’m hardly the only one whose career was strongly influenced by the now-iconic planned town of Seaside, on Florida’s Panhandle coast. A video explains why.

The Just Right Home

Buying, Renting, Moving — or Just Dreaming — Find Your Perfect Match!, a book by Marianne Cusato, Workman, 2013, 372 pp.,  $12.95 paperback

Kotkin misfires on density

In Forbes online, Joel Kotkin came out with a ringing attack on those who dare to challenge sprawl, asking "How Can We Be So Dense"? I thought this was worth responding to.

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