Research

Articles and links to research and studies

Placemaking is critical for the local economy

Do you want your community to thrive in the future? If so, placemaking is a key to making that happen.

What’s in it for me? Why placemaking matters

Why does city planning matter to people who aren’t urban designer types? Here’s an elevator pitch and a more detailed answer.

Why San Francisco, New York and DC may be more affordable than you thought

Highly enlightening new data demonstrate the immense importance of walkability and transit in shaping how affordable large US cities are for a range of household types.

23 million bikeshare rides and no deaths

A Reuters article reported this astonishing statistic: 23 million rides have been taken in US bikeshare systems since 2007 with no reported fatalities.

Walkable neighborhoods improve health, safety, and social life

A meta-analysis published in Housing Policy Debate finds that extensive studies in recent years support positive claims.

What the latest housing data mean for the environment

Let’s not pronounce sprawl dead just yet. Compared at least to the last five years, things might get a little worse before they get better. But the resurgence in city living is real.

Authors declare 'The beginning of the end of sprawl'

A strong trend toward walkable urban places is turning around development in the 30 top US metro areas, according to a study by Christopher Leinberger and Patrick Lynch.

America split between two community ideals

A Pew Research Center nationwide survey showed that America is divided nearly down the middle between preference for walkable urban and drivable suburban living arrangements.

Six ways that thoughtful community planning can help fight climate change

The good news is that growth in both sprawl and traffic has slowed considerably as people rediscover the benefits of living in cities and walkable suburban neighborhoods.

Pedestrian safety leads to more walking, or is it vice versa?

Washington, DC, New York City, San Francisco, and Honolulu also enjoy very high rates of walking to work, all around or above ten percent. Why is that?

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