Research

Articles and links to research and studies

New index examines livability

AARP has launched a Livability Index, which is the most comprehensive attempt at measuring quality of life in neighborhoods throughout the US. It is useful and problematic.

How complete streets help people and economies

Streets re-designed with all users in mind—pedestrians, transit users, and bicyclists as well as drivers of motor vehicles—generally deliver safety, environmental, and economic benefits.

The benefits of removing stop lights

A growing number of experts advocate stop light removal to save money, improve safety, make cities more walkable, and boost traffic flow. 

Miami's Walk Score rises—could form-based coding be the reason?

New York City clearly outpaced San Francisco as the nation's most walkable city—which is even more impressive when you consider that The Big Apple has about 10 times more people than The City by the Bay.

Complete Streets are safe, effective, affordable, report says

Complete Streets correlate with broader economic gains like increased employment and higher property values, according to the most comprehensive study to date of this trend.

Sprawl costs US more than a trillion dollars a year

Sprawl costs the American economy more than $1 trillion annually, according to a new study by the New Climate Economy. That's more than $3,000 for every man, woman, and child.

Boston metro shifting toward walkable urban

Metropolitan Boston is poised to be one of the most walkable metro areas in the US, according to a new study by the Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis at the George Washington University.

The forward march of form-based codes

The latest update of the of the Codes Study tracks 600 form-based codes and guidelines in the US and abroad—a significant rise in the last two years.

Office tenants choose mixed-use centers

By a margin of 83 percent to 17 percent, office tenants prefer amenity-rich, mixed-use centers—either downtown or in the suburbs.

System A and System B

When the research favors compact, mixed-use neighborhoods, why does government favor sprawl?

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